zeldathemes

sswslitinmotion:

bookriot:

What GREAT lists of diverse reads for anyone, period.

Interesting list.  I liked Junot Diaz’s Drown and highly recommend his work, but I’m on the whole “It’s kind of a Rated R” thing (but, then again, I’m never sure what to recommend to anyone under the age of 18, since once a reader is past 13, they end up reading everything, and hey, just read, kids; what do I care what kids read these days, so long as they read?). I also have Sherman Alexie on my perpetually long to-read list, along with recently adding Helen Oyeymi and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to that list. I’m not even in high school and I’m amazed by how there is so much to read and not enough time to do it… except when you’re in school to do all that reading. Do it! — ssw15

Definitely, some books might be more appropriate for certain readers and not appropriate for others; it all depends on the reading level and maturity of the reader. Since many of our students are from similar backgrounds like the characters in Diaz’s books and many unfortunately end up dealing with “adult problems” at an earlier age, they might be able to really relate to the stories in Diaz’s novels (despite the mature subject matter). 

pizzaperty:

These authors deserve all the support they can get, but are there free PDF copies of these books for ppl on limited incomes?

if not, thanks anyway. This is such an important resource!

I’m not sure about free PDFs, but as others have suggested, there are libraries (though I know this might not be a feasible option for everyone) and sites that sell copies for much cheaper than Amazon like thriftbooks.com.

disabilityinkidlit:

Unsurprisingly, we’re a fan of disabled representation—and it’s important to us that this representation is not limited to only straight and white characters. We’d like to highlight some books that break this mold.

Six MG/YA novels featuring disabled Black protagonists:

Kinda Like Brothers by Coe Booth
The Other Half of my Heart by Sundee T. Frazier
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor 
Pinned by Sharon G. Flake
Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan
Bleeding Violet by Dia Reeves

We have not yet reviewed any of these books at Disability in Kidlitthough we’d like to!—so we’d love to find out more about how well the characters are portrayed. Have you read any of these? What did you think? Share your thoughts!

eatsleepdraw:

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This post was sponsored by Craftsy.

K-12 Reading List

Back in May, a group of diverse authors made a public call to action in order to directly address the absence of diversity in children’s literature and the lack of action to fix the issue. They created the #weneeddiversebooks campaign. On May 1st, they asked people to post photos of themselves holding signs about how diverse books have enriched their lives and how the lack of diversity has affected them, on May 2nd they asked people to share their thoughts about diverse books via a twitter chat, and on May 3rd, they asked people to make the effort to diversify their shelves. The movement became a sensation, and has inspired even more people to make an effort to invest in diverse content that accurately reflects our population.

Behind the Book is elated that this movement exists. We’ve always championed the need for diverse books since we serve communities that are predominantly of color. Studies show that for kids, the lack of diversity in books is detrimental to their development, but seeing themselves reflected in protagonists raises their self-esteem and solidifies their sense of self in society. We also think it’s empowering for kids to see authors and illustrators that look like them as they’re responsible for creating the content the students love. This shows them that they too can become the authors of their own stories.

Now is the perfect time to diversify your reading material if you haven’t already. Whether you’re going on a plane to visit relatives, stuck on the train going to Coney Island, or bored at home, get lost in these fabulous stories of courage, love and family. Here’s our epic list of books that reflect the diversity of our wonderful city.

Harlem’s Little Black Bird by Renee Watson, a Behind the Book author

The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke

Brush of the Gods by Lenore Look

Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales

Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match by Monica Brown

Giant Steps to Change the World by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee

Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan

Bravo, Chico Canta! Bravo! by Pat Mora

One Love by Cedella Marley

This Jazz Man by Karen Ehrhardt

Bessie Smith and the Night Riders by Sue Stauffacher

Duck for Turkey Day by Jacqueline Jules

For descriptions, click behind the read more!

(Use the following links to be directed to the (early) Elementary, Middle Grade and High School lists)

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Elementary Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for early elementary school students.

A Place Where Hurricanes Happen by Renee Watson, a Behind the Book author

Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin by  Duncan Tonatiuh

Ellington Was Not a Street by Ntozake Shange

Pitching in For Eubie by Jerdine Nolen

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson, a Behind the Book author

Ruby and the Booker Boys #1: Brand New School, Brave New Ruby by Derrick Barnes

Goblinheart by Brett Axel

Bird by Zetta Elliot

Cora Cooks Pancit by Dorina K. Lazo Gilmore

Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown

Crossing Bok Chitto by Tim Tingle

Soccer Star by Mina Javaherbin

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, Middle Grade and High School lists)

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High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle Grade lists)

Read More

Middle Grade Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for middle grade (elementary and middle school) students.

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia, a Behind the Book author

Eighth-Grade Superzero by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich

The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street by Sharon Flake

Geeks, Girls, and Secret Identities by Mike Jung

Starry River of the Sky by Grace Lin

Garden of My Imaan by Farhana Zia

Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

The Great Greene Heist by Varian Johnson

Planet Middle School by Nikki Grimes

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

How Lamar’s Bad Prank Won a Bubba-Sized Trophy by Crystal Allen

Saving Baby Doe by Danette Vigilante

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Where the Streets Had a Name by Randa Abdel-fattah

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and High School lists)

Read More

You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all. I was like, “Yo, is something wrong with me? That the whole society seems to think that people like me don’t exist?” And part of what inspired me, was this deep desire that before I died, I would make a couple of mirrors. That I would make some mirrors so that kids like me might see themselves reflected back and might not feel so monstrous for it.
Junot Díaz (x (via feministjewishfangirl)

14 Books for Children & Teens About the Freedom Summer of 1964 

cbcdiversity:

The “Freedom Summer” of 1964 was a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark year in American history.  Here is a list of 14 children’s books that deal specifically with the remarkable events of 1964 – and 3 additional books specifically for teachers and librarians. Thank you to the following for their invaluable input:

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Picture Books for Young Readers

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Freedom Summer 

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Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Freedom Summer

By Deborah Wiles

Illustrated by Jerome Lagarrigue

Aladdin / Simon & Schuster

Ages 4 - 8

Friendship defies racism for two boys in this stirring story of the “Freedom Summer” that followed the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Now in a 50th Anniversary Edition with a refreshed cover and a new introduction.

Freedom School, Yes!

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By Amy Littlesugar

Illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Philomel / Penguin

Ages 4 - 8

In this triumphant story based on the 1964 Mississippi Freedom School Summer Project, that celebrates the strength of a people as well as the bravery of one young girl who didn’t let being scared get in her way.


The Other Side

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By Jacqueline Woodson

Illustrated by E. B. Lewis

Putnam Juvenile / Penguin

Ages 5+

Though not specifically about the 1964 Freedom Summer, this award-winning book also deals with the themes of segregation, friendship, and fairness.

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